28 - 30 November, 2016 | Crowne Plaza, Auckland New Zealand

Conference Day Two: Wednesday, 30 November 2016

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9:10 Keynote Presentation: International Student Education and Designing Space and Pedagogy that Meets Their Needs

Damian Lodge , Director of Learning and Teaching, Lincoln University

Lincoln University is New Zealand’s specialist landbased university which has focused on providing quality education to international students for over 30 years with international enrolments being as high as 50% of the total student population. The Lincoln Hub (collaboration between Lincoln University, Ag Research, Landcare Research and Dairy NZ) is currently underway, with $200 million being spent on new learning and teaching facilities that will drive New Zealand’s land based economy. The Lincoln Hub will have a strong focus on blended learning design as Lincoln University continues to improve its teaching areas, social spaces and learning experiences for staff and students. Providing quality education to international students on campus is what Lincoln is renowned for, and in this session Damian will reflect on the university’s success in catering for the needs and wants of a multi-cultural market. 
  • Meeting international students’ expectations and how it impacts the design of space and pedagogy 
  • Exploring new technologies to enable blended learning pedagogy 
  • Strategic direction of the University’s blended learning focus to attract more international students by providing greater flexibility through appropriate blended design of courses 
  • Having Personal Support programs and English language courses in place to enhance learning outcomes and experiences for international students while aiding their academic proficiency
 Damian Lodge
Damian Lodge
Director of Learning and Teaching
Lincoln University
The University of New South Wales (UNSW) 2025 strategy supports new learning designs to facilitate better learning experiences for students. This includes (re)developing many large first year courses using more open, flexible and blended learning methods. This in turn has led to a re-examination of the learning spaces. This presentation examines the new learning designs and new learning spaces needed to ensure students get the best possible learning experiences, whether they are studying on or off campus. The presentation explores case studies of different pedagogies and learning spaces and how new digital technologies and applications have provided quality agile environments to suit the ongoing and changing needs to different student cohorts. 
  • Significance of active student engagement in designing new spaces and new blended learning offerings 
  • Use of learning analytics to improve space design and pedagogies 
  • Retro-fitting existing spaces to address changing student needs 
  • Blended, flipped and online learning and their impact on desired learning spaces, facilities and services provided on and off campus 
  • Engaging students beyond geographical constraints 
  • Developing quality courses that offer flexibility, micro-credentialing possibilities and revenue-raising opportunities
Professor Bob Fox
Professor Bob Fox
Pro-Vice Chancellor (Education) Portfolio
University of New South Wales, Australia
To ensure flexible and adaptable design of spaces and pedagogies, those responsible for eLearning, technology and campus infrastructure at the University of Waikato are actively involved with staff and students in revising curriculums into a more blended fashion. Providing guidance for lecturers to utilise tools and resources in a way that best suits them, while also sparking an inquisitiveness to learn through experimentation, is vital for improved user confidence and agility. In this session, Nigel discusses: 
  • What defines “digital literacy” and what are the contexts? 
  • Benefits of greater communication and collaboration among eLearning designers and end users 
  • How to encourage blended learning in pedagogy but not lock teachers in an inflexible approach 
  • Strategies applied in guiding staff in the application of technology within their teaching, such as working with individuals and teams and recognising the importance of just-in-time learning 
  • Embedding digital literacy within learning activities to allow students to enhance their academic and digital capabilities 
  • Strategies to make use of technology ‘real’ for staff and students, and moving away from traditional training session formats 
  • What sort of things the education sector could be doing to support digital literacy development
 Nigel Robertson
Nigel Robertson
eLearning Designer
University of Waikato

11:40 The Elephant in the room: Insights on making the move from face-to-face to online training

Ram Lingam , eLearning Specialist, Auckland Council

In our modern digital age, teachers and trainers are increasingly moving their face-to-face content from a 2D space into a virtual online space. But this presents many challenges in regards to outcomes and capabilities, for how can we foster the interaction between pedagogy and space design, especially online? In this session, Ram discusses key considerations when moving pedagogies into the virtual space, including the significance of synchronising physical, cultural and virtual spaces to ensure a smooth transition. His presentation will highlight the following: 
  • Finding a balance between online and face to face experience is an important component to effective pedagogy – how can we ensure this is being carried out efficiently? 
  • How can we improve the quality of learning and teaching in an online environment? 
  • Online learning has historically been an individual learning experience – How can eLearning designers and teachers deliver the same engaging and interactive experience to online students as in the faceto- face learning approach? What are the ground rules for ensuring success?
  • What are some strategies for capability building of staff and learners?
 Ram Lingam
Ram Lingam
eLearning Specialist
Auckland Council

12:20 Keynote Presentation: Designing Spaces that Support Digital Learning and Maximise Collaboration and Engagement

Professor Giselle Byrnes , Assistant Vice-Chancellor Research, Academic and Enterprise, Massey University

Massey University has been actively involved in futureproofing its buildings since 2008. While being very popular among students from all academic disciplines, the building effectively engages users and visitors through innovative spaces and technologically-enabled pedagogies with an impressive 90% satisfaction rate. Giselle reflects on the university’s success, and focuses on the following: 
  • How can we create learning environments that serve to inspire and engage our students and staff? 
  • The move from “instructional” teaching to “constructional” teaching, and how has this changed teacher and student roles 
  • Why do we need to align space design with digital technology? 
  • The innovative design and refresh of programmes within an LMS and virtual learning environment 
  • Tailoring spaces and technology to suit teachers and their preferred pedagogies 
  • Providing adequate professional development and realigning pedagogical practice to optimise learning and teaching
Professor Giselle Byrnes
Professor Giselle Byrnes
Assistant Vice-Chancellor Research, Academic and Enterprise
Massey University

14:00 CASE STUDY: The Push for Cultural Change across Departments with Inherently Traditional Pedagogies – The Challenges, Solutions and Benefits

Chris Whittington , Senior Lecturer in Mechanical Engineering, Auckland University of Technology

Chris Whittington of Auckland University of Technology delves into the complexities of cultural change. As a senior lecturer of Mechanical Engineering, Chris has first-hand experience in the technicalities of adapting inherently traditional disciplines to modern spaces and pedagogies. He acts as change champion in his efforts to instigate, manage and encourage change in his pedagogies, while doing his best to optimise utilisation of spaces and technology that is provided. In this session, Chris discusses: 
  • Challenges in shifting behaviours – how subjects embedded with traditional pedagogies remain static to change due to a lack of guidance and support for staff 
  • Strategies to incorporate blended learning in disciplines static to change 
  • How to utilise spaces to maximise interaction and collaboration between staff and students 
  • The benefits of flip-classrooms in traditionally static disciplines, and how teachers will benefit from selfdetermined students who are proficient in problemsolving 
  • Understand the “bigger picture” – using learning analytics to understand user capabilities and preferences to enable strategic planning for course design, pedagogies and space design
 Chris Whittington
Chris Whittington
Senior Lecturer in Mechanical Engineering
Auckland University of Technology

14:40 EXPERT PANEL DISCUSSION: Personalised Learning and Progression

Professor Giselle Byrnes , Assistant Vice-Chancellor Research, Academic and Enterprise, Massey University

Dr Linda Keesing-Styles , Dean Teaching and Learning, Unitec Institute of Technology

Chris Whittington , Senior Lecturer in Mechanical Engineering, Auckland University of Technology

Nigel Robertson , eLearning Designer, University of Waikato

As students transition through levels of learning, universities must plan and design curriculums that are flexible, responsive and adaptive to changing environments, competencies and expectations as universities and students alike progress through levels of sophistication. This expert panel will discuss challenges they face and solutions, in particular how spaces and technology can enhance and support an individual’s confidence and way of learning.
Professor Giselle Byrnes
Professor Giselle Byrnes
Assistant Vice-Chancellor Research, Academic and Enterprise
Massey University
Dr Linda Keesing-Styles
Dr Linda Keesing-Styles
Dean Teaching and Learning
Unitec Institute of Technology
 Chris Whittington
Chris Whittington
Senior Lecturer in Mechanical Engineering
Auckland University of Technology
 Nigel Robertson
Nigel Robertson
eLearning Designer
University of Waikato

16:00 Resourcing Yourself for Leadership in a Changing World

Louise Marra , Leadership Advisor and Program Director, Leadership New Zealand

Education, like all other sectors, is requiring different approaches to leadership and culture to meet the challenges of our time. We work in a fast moving world, often with plans that are outdated as they are printed. In this session, Louise urges us to question “how” we can better prepare ourselves for leadership in a changing world. She will explore key themes in relation to strategic leadership and change management, as well as the nature of wicked problems and our moving from just efficiency to responsiveness and trust in our ability to work constantly with change. 
  • How do we resource ourselves for this world? We are our vessel of leadership at all levels of leadership – How do we work with ourselves and our own way of being to model the change we want to see in the world, and not just demand it? 
  • How do we plan “not to know”? 
  • How do we work with the future to innovate now?
  • How do we disperse and distribute leadership and decisions to their most effective places, working with autonomy and collaboration? 
  • How do we make change and growth become everyday practice, and how do we become living updates of ourselves in our work?
 Louise Marra
Louise Marra
Leadership Advisor and Program Director
Leadership New Zealand

16:40 Evaluating Space and Technology: Finding the Right Fit For You

Dr Terry Byers , Director of Innovation in Learning, Anglican Church Grammar School, Brisbane Australia

The potential of innovative learning environments spurred on by the possibilities of ubiquitous access to digital technology, has seen considerable investment in building programmes in all sectors of education. There are some who argue that this investment has seen a building ‘arms race between institutions.’ The outcome of this ‘building binge’ are the construction of extravagant architectural spaces, which appear to favour ‘aesthetics’ at the expense of their primary function as a place for learning. In fact, there is little empirical evidence that the financial and human investments in innovative learning environments and the integration of the latest technologies has equated to any tangible return. This session will present empirical evidence from the six-year Anglican Church Grammar School (Churchie) and University of Melbourne’s Learning Environments Applied Research Network (LEaRN) New Generation Learning Spaces (NGLS) project. Key findings include: 
  • Understanding how an innovative learning environment and current technologies can inhibit the full spectrum of pedagogies and learning experiences. 
  • How the spatial layout can impact on the utilisation and effectiveness of the digital technology. 
  • Methodologies to track and evaluate the impact of the inhabitation of different learning environments on teachers and students. 
  • Empirical metrics that can support teacher professional development through the occupation of different learning environments through the provision of real-time feedback.
Dr Terry Byers
Dr Terry Byers
Director of Innovation in Learning
Anglican Church Grammar School, Brisbane Australia